Term:sense

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OVERVIEW OF NOUN SENSE

1) sense: a general conscious awareness; “a sense of security”; “a sense of happiness”; “a sense of danger”; “a sense of self

2) sense, signified: the meaning of a word or expression; the way in which a word or expression or situation can be interpreted; “the dictionary gave several senses for the word”; “in the best sense charity is really a duty”; “the signifier is linked to the signified”

3) sense, sensation, sentience, sentiency, sensory faculty: the faculty through which the external world is apprehended; “in the dark he had to depend on touch and on his senses of smell and hearing”

Image of sense
Image of sense

4) common sense, good sense, gumption, horse sense, sense, mother wit: sound practical judgment; “Common sense is not so common”; “he hasn’t got the sense God gave little green apples”; “fortunately she had the good sense to run away

5) sense: a natural appreciation or ability; “a keen musical sense”; “a good sense of timing”

OVERVIEW OF VERB SENSE

1) feel, sense: perceive by a physical sensation, e.g., coming from the skin or muscles; “He felt the wind”; “She felt an object brushing her arm”; “He felt his flesh crawl”; “She felt the heat when she got out of the car

2) sense: detect some circumstance or entity automatically; “This robot can sense the presence of people in the room”; “particle detectors sense ionization”

3) sense: become aware of not through the senses but instinctively; “I sense his hostility”

4) sense: comprehend; “I sensed the real meaning of his letter

noun sense has 5 sense(s) (first 5 from tagged texts)


sense (Wikipedia)
This article is about the empirical or physical senses of living organisms (sight, hearing, etc.). For other uses, see Sense (disambiguation) or Five senses (disambiguation).
Five senses and the respective sensory organs
An allegory of five senses. Still Life by Pieter Claesz, 1623. The painting illustrates the senses through musical instruments, a compass, a book, food and drink, a mirror, incense and an open perfume bottle. The tortoise could be a possible illustration of touch or an allusion to the opposite, screening of or shielding the senses (the tortoise isolating in its shell)

A sense is a physiological capacity of organisms that provides data for perception. The senses and their operation, classification, and theory are overlapping topics studied by a variety of fields, most notably neuroscience, cognitive psychology (or cognitive science), and philosophy of perception. The nervous system has a specific sensory system or organ, dedicated to each sense.

Humans have a multitude of senses. Sight (ophthalmoception), hearing (audioception), taste (gustaoception), smell (olfacoception or olfacception), and touch (tactioception) are the five traditionally recognized senses. The ability to detect other stimuli beyond those governed by these most broadly recognized senses also exists, and these sensory modalities include temperature (thermoception), kinesthetic sense (proprioception), pain (nociception), balance (equilibrioception), vibration (mechanoreception), and various internal stimuli (e.g. the different chemoreceptors for detecting salt and carbon dioxide concentrations in the blood). However, what constitutes a sense is a matter of some debate, leading to difficulties in defining what exactly a distinct sense is, and where the borders between responses to related stimuli lay.

Other animals also have receptors to sense the world around them, with degrees of capability varying greatly between species. Humans have a comparatively weak sense of smell relative to many other mammals while some animals may lack one or more of the traditional five senses. Some animals may also intake and interpret sensory stimuli in very different ways. Some species of animals are able to sense the world in a way that humans cannot, with some species able to sense electrical and magnetic fields, and detect water pressure and currents.

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